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Apr. 21st, 2014

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Apr. 20th, 2014

38. A Stranger in Mayfair–Charles Finch

Something of a transitional book for Charles Lenox. He’s a newly minted member of Parliament and newly married, attempting to find his feet in both circumstances, and finding, to his dismay, that he misses sussing out murderers and that when an opportunity to do so arises, he’s finding that more interesting than putting his shoulder to the wheel with regard to blue books and study of proposals in Parliament.

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Apr. 19th, 2014

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37. The White Lioness–Henning Mankell

Kurt Wallander is a struggling with the changes happening to his world. His country is changing and he’s not sure he’s happy with its new-found ways. But he’s also a cop so he’s focused on trying to find a missing woman.  From the first he’s baffled by seemingly unrelated clues that keep complicating the search. When he finds her dead, he’s even more baffled because he can find no reason whatsoever that she’d be the victim of a crime, never mind the victim of what appears to be an assassination.

A terrific series and this a worthy entry to it.

36. Perdido Street Station–China Mieville

China Mieville has such a rich imagination that the locations where he sets his works are a character in themselves. The city of Crobuzon is no exception. It is a rusting out, miserable run-down place populated with a multitude of peoples centered in various areas of the city. But most, traveling the city’s version of mass transport, will pass through Perdido Street Station.

The story begins with a renegade scientist’s quest to help a tortured Garuda regain his lost wings and return to the air. But the story quickly devolves into a quest to stop creatures that are terrorizing the city and leaving a wake of mindless bodies in their wake.

Complex, depressing at times, maddening at others, never boring.

Apr. 15th, 2014

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Apr. 14th, 2014

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Apr. 13th, 2014

35. [The Polish Officer] - Alan Furst

The third book in the excellent Night Soldiers series, follows a Polish Officer as he escapes from Poland just as the Nazis take his country.  He joins the resistance and fights over much of Europe as he does whatever he can to help the Allies defeat Hitler.

Wonderfully done, understated on the violence and with a disturbing insight into the miseries of all out war.

34. The Bat–Jo Nesbo

First in the Harry Hole series, set in Australia, rather than at home. Harry has come to Australia because a Norwegian woman was murdered and he’s there to investigate and find information about what has happened.

Not much in the way of character development for Harry in this book, and I thought it far too full of info dumps. Hopefully I’ll like others in the series better.

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